I will help you deal with bullying and to make sure you don’t reciprocate

Every human being is going through some sort of transition, whether it’s reinventing your business, changing your relationship, upgrading your team skills or even transitioning from 49 to 50 years of age. I operate a boutique consultancy specialised in transition planning …for both business’ and individuals. I’m Australia’s and maybe the world’s leader in transitioning, I specialise guiding real people through real transitions.

ONE SUCH TRANSITION I WILL HELP YOU WITH IS: BULLYING

I will help you transition from being bullied or doing the bullying to a balanced space.

Things you need to know:

  1. Women do more bullying than men. See the Forbes article Below.
  2. It’s illegal in some countries for business and domestic bullying.
  3. There is a perception of an innocent victim and a perpetrator… (which is rarely true)
  4. Given the political correctness of “anti Bullying” campaigns, which are in themselves, bullying, it is very difficult to deal with this topic out of context.
  5. There is no excuse for it and I can help you transition through it in private.

If you would like to book a telephone session on this, please email me here. Telephone  Consult Sessions are $50 per 20 minutes.

 

Wikipedia 

Bullying is the use of force, threat, or coercion to abuseintimidate, or aggressively dominate others. The behavior is often repeated and habitual. One essential prerequisite is the perception, by the bully or by others, of an imbalance of social or physical power, which distinguishes bullying from conflict.[1] Behaviors used to assert such domination can include verbal harassment or threat, physical assault or coercion, and such acts may be directed repeatedly towards particular targets. Rationalizations for such behavior sometimes include differences of social class, race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, appearance, behavior, body language, personality, reputation, lineage, strength, size or ability.[2][3] If bullying is done by a group, it is called mobbing.[4]

Bullying can be defined in many different ways. The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland has no legal definition of bullying,[5] while some states in the United States have laws against it.[6] Bullying is divided into four basic types of abuse – emotional (sometimes called relational), verbalphysical, and cyber.[7] It typically involves subtle methods of coercion, such as intimidation.

Bullying ranges from one-on-one, individual bullying through to group bullying called mobbing, in which the bully may have one or more “lieutenants” who may seem to be willing to assist the primary bully in his or her bullying activities. Bullying in school and the workplace is also referred to as peer abuse.[8] Robert W. Fuller has analyzed bullying in the context of rankism.

bullying culture can develop in any context in which humans interact with each other. This includes school, family, the workplace, home, and neighborhoods. In a 2012 study of male adolescent American football players, “the strongest predictor [of bullying] was the perception of whether the most influential male in a player’s life would approve of the bullying behavior”.[9]

FORBES ARTICLE

According to a 2007 survey from the Employment Law Alliance, of the 45% of people who said they had been bullied in the workplace, 40% said they were bullied by women. That in and of itself does not prove women are more likely to torment other women. But a 2014 report from the Workplace Bullying Institute claims that women who were considered workplace bullies targeted other women 68% of the time. Sindell also uncovered a 2011 report from the American Management Associationwhich declared that about 95% of women have been “tormented” by another woman during their careers.

Forbes Magazine Full Article Here

EXCERPT FROM FORBESphoto

There’s always going to be friction between certain people in any work environment. Whether it stems from personality differences, competition or minor quibbles and pet peeves, not everyone is going to get along.

But aggression between women, it seems, is a trend in the workplace that may come as some surprise, says Thuy Sindell, founder of leadership consultancy Skyline International. Sindell and her team surveyed more than 1,000 professionals on leadership qualities and in doing so found that, in their survey, women rated the effectiveness of other women lower 57% of the time for workplace competencies, compared to men at 14%.

“Overall, women are rating women harder, hands down, across most competencies,” Sindell says. Intirgued with the results, she found that there is other data to support that hypothesis from other sources.

According to a 2007 survey from the Employment Law Alliance, of the 45% of people who said they had been bullied in the workplace, 40% said they were bullied by women. That in and of itself does not prove women are more likely to torment other women. But a 2014 report from the Workplace Bullying Institute claims that women who were considered workplace bullies targeted other women 68% of the time. Sindell also uncovered a 2011 report from the American Management Associationwhich declared that about 95% of women have been “tormented” by another woman during their careers.

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